21-Day Challenge!

created by Dr. Eddie Moore, Jr. & Debby Irving

 

"You must be the change you wish to see in the world.” Mahatma Gandhi

 

Have you ever made a successful change in your life? Perhaps you wanted to exercise more, eat less, or change jobs? Think about the time and attention you dedicated to the process. A lot, right? Change is hard. Creating effective social justice habits, particularly those dealing with issues of power, privilege and leadership is like any lifestyle change. Setting our intentions and adjusting what we spend our time doing is essential. It’s all about building new habits. Sometimes the hardest part it just getting started. We think understanding white privilege is a powerful lens into racism’s complexities. The good news is, there’s an abundance of resources just waiting to empower you to be a more effective player in the quest for racial justice.

The 21-Day Racial Equity Habit Building Challenge‚Äč is our way to support your effort to build your racial justice muscle. It’s simple: For 21 days, you do an action to further your connection to Power, Privilege & Leadership concepts and networks. See some ideas below.

READ 

books

Between the World and Me, by Ta-Nehisi Coates. A memoir written as a series of letters to his son. Raw and powerful storytelling illuminating the black American experience.

Birth of a White Nation: The Invention of White People and Its Relevance Today, by Jacqueline Battalora. An exploration of the moment in time when "white people," as a separate and distinct group of humanity, were invented through legislation and the enactment of laws.

Everyday White People Confront Racial and Social Injustice: 15 Stories, by Eddie Moore, Marguerite W. Penick-Parks & Ali Michael (Editors), Paul C. Gorski.(forward). 15 stories about what is entailed in developing a white anti-racist identity.

The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness, by Michelle Alexander. An in-depth look at U.S. policies that target black men, rendingering the U.S. criminal justice system as a contemporary system of racial control.

Privilege, Power, and Difference, by Allan G. Johnson. An examination of systems of privilege and difference written in accessible, conversational language.

Waking Up White, and Finding Myself in the Story of Race, by Debby Irving. A brutally honest and engaging memoir exploring the way white people are socialized not to see or understand racism in their own lives. Inclu des end-of-chapter questions for self-reflection.

What White Children Need to Know About Race, Article exploring how not talking about race during childhood can leave white adults ill-equipped and fearful to talk about it as adults. Tips for how to get and keep the conversation going with children and beyond.

WATCH

Race: The Power of an Illusion Award-winning three-part documentary about the biology, politics, social construction, and lived experience of race. 

I Am NOT Black, You are NOT White Prince Ea compares using skin color as a way to judge a person to using the one drives as a way to judge a person. 

watch

The Dog Whistle Politics of Race (Ian Haney Lopez with Bill Moyers) Part I and Part II Interview exploring how post civil rights era racialized language divides and deludes American citizens, effectively encouraging many to vote against their own interests.

Test Your Awareness: Do The Test Once people start to learn about white   privilege and America’s systems of oppression through history, often they ask, “Why didn’t I see this sooner?” It’s easy to overlook what we’re not looking for. Ask yourself what you have been looking for? What consumes your attention?

Park Avenue: Money, Power & The American Dream PBS film exploring wealth and power dynamics and examines why. Is the game rigged? Who notices? What makes addressing this issue as a society so fraught?

Unequal Opportunity Race Animated short illustrating the accumulated impact of white power and privilege.

What Would You Do?  ABC’s popular show explores the impact of racial and gender bias and prejudice at a family friendly park. Before this video, would you have anticipated this differential treatment?

In The White Man's Image PBS documentary about the Indian boarding school movement designed to “kill the Indian and save the man.”

CONNECT

connect star

Like Facebook Pages of organizations who post daily about issues of power and privilege (TheRoot, RaceForward, Upworthy, Got Privilege?, Teaching Tolerance, BLM, Youth Action Project, & Moore

Google who’s who in your area by typing in ‘Racial Justice (name of city/town). A few emails and phone calls later, you’ll likely have an idea of how to get on the mailing of one or more organizations in your area who are addressing issues of power and privilege.

Showing Up For Racial Justice (SURJ) organizes, mobilizes, and educates white people: See website here.

White People Challenging Racism (WPCR) education and resources. See website here.

ENGAGE

talk

This can the hardest part for white people new to racial justice work. Engaging in racially mixed settings can trigger age-old power and privilege dynamics. The goal is to enter the process to learn and bridge knowledge gaps, not to take over, lead, and impose solutions.

Stay engaged even when your mind and body start sending you signals to shrink or walk away.

Ask clarifying questions.

Acknowledge what you don’t know.

Journal to process emotions such as shame and anger that can guide you to deeper self-awareness about how power and privilege impacts you.

Find a mentor within your own racial group to support and guide your growth.

ACT 

action

Take a course or workshop. This one goes hand in hand with ‘Connect’ above. The network of people you discover may point you to a class, or finding a class first may point you to a network.

Prepare yourself to interrupt racial jokes. Click here for some advice about how.

Organize a film night or book group with family, friends, colleagues, or neighbors to learn and discuss together the dynamics and realities of privilege and power.

Attend an event in your area where issues of power and privilege are being addressed. Universities and bookstores often host speakers who draw the network you’ll want to plug into to keep engaged and motivated.

STAY INSPIRED!

music

Create a Soundtrack4Justice playlist that fuels you and/or can serve as a conversation starter with people of all ages. Just a few ideas are:

Get Up, Stand Up / Bob Marley

Give Your Hands to Struggle / Sweet Honey in the Rock

Where Is The Love / Black Eyed Peas

White Privilege / Mackelmore

White Privilege II / Macklemore

White Privilege 3 / Gyasi Ross

Super Rich Kids / Frank Ocean

Strength, Courage & Wisdom / India Arie

Whitey on the Moon / Gil Scott-Heron

Be Free / J Cole

The 10 Stop and Frisk Commandments / Jasiri X

Alexander Hamilton (sountrack) / Various Artists (sample here)

If It's Magic / Stevie Wonder

Same Love / Macklemore & Ryan Lewis

Keep Your Head Up / Tupac

Try / Colbie Caillat

Living for the City / Stevie Wonder

Fight the Power / Public Enemy

People Get Ready / Curtis Mayfield and The Impressions

 

Pencil

USE THE PLANNING TOOL BELOW TO STAY ON TRACK

21-Day Racial Equity Habit Building Challenge

Tip: diversify your habits by doing some of each.

Day

Read

Watch

Connect

Engage

Act

Notes

1

 

 

 

 

 

             See sample below!

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11

 

 

 

 

 

 

12

 

 

 

 

 

 

13

 

 

 

 

 

 

14

 

 

 

 

 

 

15

 

 

 

 

 

 

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21

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

21-Day Racial Equity Habit Building Challenge (sample)

Day

Read

Watch

Connect

Engage

Act

Notes

1

 

 

 

 

Started Waking Up White.

2

 

 

 

 

OMG, why didn’t I learn this stuff sooner!?

3

 

 

 

 

Book mentioned True Colors. Found it online. Still true today?

4

 

 

 

 

Found Local Group. On mailing list, liked FB pg. Going to meet on 9/15!

5

 

 

 

 

Read local Group’s website. Couldn’t stop reading.

6

 

 

 

 

Attended Local Group film + discussion. Awesome people.

7

 

 

More I learn more I learn I don’t know. Want more, more, more!

8

 

 

 

 

2nd day in a row I called a new Local Group connection for ideas.

9

 

 

 

 

Reading how to interrupt racist jokes. Do I dare? Feeling scared.

10

 

 

 

 

‘Liked’ three national racial justice organizations on FB.

11

 

 

 

Attended lecture by John Powell at Local U. Wow. Where have I been?

12

 

 

 

New FB likes post amazing stuff. Feeling inspired!

13

 

 

Focusing on whiteness in schools.  So many orgs/resources. Who knew?

14

 

 

 

 

Called 5 friends for dinner + film. All psyched but John. Pissed me off!

15

 

 

 

Read up on ways to address people like John. Called. Good-ish talk.

16

 

 

 

 

Signed up to take class at Local Community College.

17

 

 

 

 

Attended Local Group MeetUp. Talking Guidelines super helpful.

18

 

 

 

 

Met MeetUp friends for a beer. Went to part of town I’d never been to.

19

 

 

 

 

MeetUp friend loaned me Birth of a White Nation. Can’t put it down.

20

 

 

 

Hosted dinner + White Man’s Image film. Shocking, bonding, motivating. 

21

 

 

 

 

Asked boss how to get on diversity committee. Want to join.